Episode 339: Stop This Fear And Start Getting Testimonies From Clients

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Have you ever had a negative experience with a company but felt like your voice wasn't being heard? You're not alone. Many companies today are failing because they do not ask for feedback from their customers. This can result in a disconnect between what customers want and what companies are delivering, leading to lost sales and damaged reputations. In today's fast-paced and ever-changing business landscape, it's more important than ever to actively seek out feedback from your customers and take action.In this episode of the Bella in Your Business: Pet Industry Business , I am talking about the importance of asking for feedback from your clients. I will be diving deep into the triggers and insecurities that may hold some business owners back from asking for feedback, and explaining why every pet business owner must embrace feedback as a tool for growth and improvement. You won't want to miss out on the insights, including some of the feedback loop examples and the significance of personalizing the feedback process and actively listening to your clients. So be sure to tune in for much more! :)

Topics Discussed and Key Points

  • Feedback is not just about creating positive testimonials
  • How feedback can help improve services
  • The fear of negative feedback and how it can be related to personal triggers and insecurities.
  • Alleviating some of the pressure that comes with feedback
  • Embracing feedback and constructive criticism
  • Good girl syndrome, the  desire for validation and approval
  • Asking for feedback using open-ended questions.
  • Systematic systematized feedback collection
  • Importance of feedback loops
  • The “100 days’ system
  • The importance of not letting insecurities and ego prevent you from  asking for feedback

Timestamps

[00:16] Introduction to today’s show [01:31] Why is feedback important?[03:36] Addressing triggers and insecurities[07:38] Creating feedback loops[08:50] Examples of feedback loops[09:39] Listening to clients and  what they have to say[10:29] Why you should create a structure

Notable Quotes

[00:01:35] “As a pet business owner, you want to make sure that you’re providing the best possible service and experience for your clients, right? The only way to know if you’re achieving it is to hear from customers directly. And that’s where the feedback comes in.” [00:01:48]

[00:01:48] “Feedback is not just about creating positive testimonials as we talked about, but it’s also listening to it for constructive criticism and making changes accordingly. It’s a valuable tool for growth and improvement.” [00:02:01]

[00:03:42] “As a business owner, it’s natural to want to do your best and provide top-notch service for your clients. Although it’s important to remember that no one’s perfect and mistakes happen.” [00:03:51]

[00:04:05] “Feedback can be scary, especially if you’re worried about receiving negative comments. However, constructive criticism can be a valuable tool for improving your services and growing your business.” [00:04:18]

[00:04:30] “By listening to your customers’ feedback and addressing their concerns, you can build trust and loyalty.” [00:04:36]

[00:06:39] “It’s not until you grow and evolve that you realize that your business isn’t you. And when they’re saying something against the business, they’re not saying it against you. They’re saying it against this entity.” [00:06:50]

[00:07:40] “Creating feedback loops is crucial for the success of any pet business. It’s important to have multiple ways to collect feedback, including face-to-face interactions, online reviews, and surveys by providing different options for client customers to share their feedback.”[00:07:56]

[00:11:21] “Don’t let your own insecurities in your ego prevent you from asking for feedback because you don’t want to see anything negative or you’re afraid of being in trouble.” [00:11:31]

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Transcript

Oh boy, I don’t know if you’re ready for this episode. What’s up everybody, my name is Bella Vasta. Today, we’re not talking about asking for feedback. But I am talking about why a lot of you don’t ask for feedback, and I’m gonna call you out. I don’t mean any of you to take this personally I am sitting here in my office right now all by myself, I do not have anyone in my head. But I do have these notes. And this, we’re gonna talk about the psychology of this. Because a few episodes ago, we talked about how to get feedback and how to get testimonies we talked about, I gave you scripts, and I told you, this is exactly what you need to say. And, you know, some of you downloaded it. But I was kind of surprised how many people didn’t just take that gift, it was like it was given out chocolate. I love chocolate. But before we get into that, I want to say thank you for listening to the episode, please subscribe, like, share, share it out, and let people know you’re listening to it. And this episode in particular, might ruffle some feathers, but I’m okay with that I have been put in this position too. To do that. Again, this is not intended for any one person, even if you think it feels like that. But remember that I can only teach what I know. And when I’m doing this, and when I’m talking about this, I’m talking from experience. So why is feedback so important? As a pet business owner, you want to make sure that you’re providing the best possible service and experience for your clients, right? The only way to know if you’re achieving it is to hear from customers directly. And that’s where the feedback comes in Feedback is not just about creating positive testimonials like we talked about. But it’s also listening to it for constructive criticism, and making changes accordingly. It’s a valuable tool for growth and improvement. Here I go off script again, I was doing an intensive in Seattle. And it was amazing. It was such a good time. And my client kind of looked at me and she’s like Bella, pet care team training. Because I’m the co-owner of that it’s you can train your staff and under two hours, get them petsitting CPR and First Aid certified, as well as a dog walker and petsitter certified. Each one of those is two-hour certification. So for four hours, you can get them certified, which is amazing, because it’s the only thing out there that it will only be four hours or two hours depending on which one you get. But um, she said to me, she said, You know, when I hire a bunch of people, it’s expensive, because it’s like 150 a pop. And I was like, okay, but it’s an investment. She’s like, Yeah, but what did you think about a subscription? And I was kind of resistant to the idea first, but right now we’re working on the tech for that. What if you could do you know, two subscriptions, you know, you just buy two subscriptions a month on autopilot? So it’s banking in your bank, right? So when you need it, and when you hire, it’s not an additional expense. It’s something that’s already been happening. And so that is my example. That’s my point on why we do want to listen to our clients constructive criticism and make changes accordingly. It’s a valuable tool for growth and improvement. So today, we’re going to talk actually about addressing your triggers, and insecurities. I told you, this is gonna get uncomfortable before it gets comfortable, the infamous good girl syndrome and creating feedback loops. So here we go, we’re gonna, let’s let’s start with your triggers and insecurities. Okay, so let’s start by understanding that as a business owner, it’s natural to want to do your best and provide top-notch service for your clients. Although it’s important to remember that no one’s perfect and mistakes happen. So acknowledging this fact can help alleviate some of the pressure that comes with the feedback. So I know that a lot of times, no, I’m not even going to jump there yet. I’m not going to jump there yet. I’m gonna stay on script. There’s gonna be so good, though. So feedback can be scary, especially if you’re worried about receiving negative comments. However, constructive criticism can be a valuable tool for improving your services and growing your business. So instead of seeing feedback as a threat, I want you to embrace it. I want you to think about it as ways to identify for improvement of your business and you can make adjustments that can lead to a better customer service experience, by listening to your customer’s feedback and addressing their concerns. You can build trust and loyalty because now they say something, you fix it for them. And then they come back and they’re like, Okay, great. They care about what I’m thinking, right? I think the deep down and I’m going to talk about my own experience. And I think you know any of you guys I’m gonna be 41 in July. And I think generally, generationally, we can all kind of relate because we were all kind of brought up roughly the same way. I was always, I was brought up in a loud, strict Italian household. And, I think that I was always seeking approval as a child. So I know I was always seeking approval, I’ve done lots of therapy and inner child work. And I’m so seeking feedback from clients, or I remember, anytime a client would be upset at me, or upset at the system, or the product, or whatever it was, I would instantly go into my little girl, and I didn’t realize it. But I would feel like my dad was like yelling at me. And I think that a lot of people bring this into business. And we never want to feel that way. Because we take it so personal, because of our unhealed or unresolved trauma or conflicts. And so what happens is, we get into this good girl syndrome, you’re supposed to be a good girl. It’s a term that refers to the tendency of business owners to only seek positive feedback from their customers, their desire for validation, and approval, it can cause business owners to avoid asking for constructive criticism, or avoid addressing negative feedback altogether. Because you’re afraid of that. And you feel like you should be a good girl, you should not rock the boat, you should not do anything that makes people angry. So instead, we’re going to just stick our heads in the sand. And I know that might sound a little extreme for some, but if you think about it, that’s I think, at least for me, speaking from my experience, and a lot of my clients, that is the crux of all of it. It’s not until you grow and evolve, that you realize that your business isn’t you. And when they’re saying something against the business, they’re not saying it against you, they’re saying it against this entity. I mean, honestly, most of you guys are filing C corpse or s corpse right now, that business isn’t you that business happens, then it passes through to even your taxes. Maybe that’s a silly example. But that’s what comes to my mind right now. So I think part of not asking for feedback, is because we want to maintain this good girl image, we want to maintain that we’re doing everything right. And the fear of the rejection or knowing that we’re not is terrifying and debilitating. And so we just we stay away from it, we pretend it doesn’t exist. But jumpers, I want to encourage you it does exist. And it can help propel your business in ways that you don’t even realize. And so it’s really important to do that. The other part of this is creating feedback loops. So creating feedback loops is crucial for the success of any pet business, it’s important to have multiple ways to collect feedback, including face to face interactions, online, reviews, and surveys, by providing different options for client customers to share their feedback, you can ensure you’re getting a well rounded view of their experiences with your business. Now, every positive has a negative. That does not mean you need to start automating and sending people automated, Hey, how was your experience with us? There’s nothing more impersonal than that. And I guarantee you, you’re not going to get that many responses, as opposed to if you were to create 100 Day client experience, where you reach out to them personally, and then give them that link. Just something to think about. Also, when we’re asking for feedback, we want to ask open-ended questions and listen carefully to their concerns and provide valuable insight because it can provide valuable insight into how you can improve your services. Once you’ve received the feedback, it’s important to take action and make changes based on it. This can help improve customer satisfaction and loyalty. Who doesn’t like to know that they’re listened to right? Some example of feedback loops include after-consultation feedback, where you ask clients about their experience after using your service, or systematic systematized feedback collection, where you have the process in place to consistently collect and analyze feedback. Again, I would do this personally. So you can you can have your back-end system and be clear about this. You can have your back-end system where you’re like, Okay, yep, it’s week four, we need to check in with Suzy and Mary right. But how you do it isn’t an automatic email from MailChimp, okay? It is something where you’re like pick up the phone, and you call them or you text them personally. So you want to have it on a system but you don’t want them to feel like it’s on a system that’s very, very important. The next part is listening to what they have to say. It’s essential to listen to your clients and understand their needs beyond ensuring that their pets are taking care of ask them how they felt about your experience. Instead of just like, you know do we do a good job. I always like to say was everything to your satisfaction? Or if it is a survey How did it make you feel? And then let them write it in? Where they left feeling satisfied? Were their areas for improvement did you make them feel supported and cared for? Or when were they left with lingering concerns? Were all of your concerns addressed? Were you left with any questions? Did we present everything you needed to know before you even needed to know it on a scale of one to five, in addition to actively listening to your clients and addressing their needs, you, you want to create the structure. And that’s, that’s what I was saying, you have to create a structure for it. Because if you leave it up to your own devices, it is going to fail, you’re not going to stay on task with it, and you’re not going to be asking them all the time. So you need to have a system in place. The system that you heard me talk about the last episode, and now again, this episode is 100 days. If you get Joey Coleman’s book, never lose a customer. And he’s actually coming out with one for employees. But they’re like the same premise guys. Joey Coleman came in and taught our community twice, I think. And we did a book club on it too. But it’s because it’s a really important thing. It helps with company culture with your employees, and it helps with customer retention. And so you can’t necessarily know this information unless you know the numbers unless you get the data unless you ask for feedback. So don’t let your own insecurities and your ego prevent you from asking for feedback, because you don’t want to see anything negative or you’re afraid of being in trouble. Okay, I want you to consider why don’t we ask for more regular feedback, what is in your ego that is holding you back from being the greatest that you can be? All right. I want to encourage you guys in the show notes, I’m gonna put a link. I was on a coaching call this week with Tracy. And she’s amazing. She’s so fun. I told her, I was like You are the reason why I love coaching. Like you just get those clients where they execute everything. And they’re excited. And they’re soaking it all up. But they’re pouring it right back out. You know, it’s really exciting. And then she gave me glowing feedback. And I said, I would love to have that on video, would you mind videoing that when we got off the call, she did and she, and we posted it on our Instagram, and I’ll put the link in our show notes. Or you can just go to my Instagram, it’s Bella Vasta, then you can scroll through my feed and you can see it. But it’s guys, it’s important. It’s important. Every time someone says something good about your company to capture it somehow, it’s important to ask your people am I serving you? So in that spirit, I’m going to ask you guys, am I serving you on these podcasts? I’ve decided to make these podcasts a lot shorter. They’re a lot more bite sized right now. Is that good for you? Do you like that? Do you prefer that? Over the 30-minute long podcast. I am all about getting quickly to the point, no fluff. I don’t want to sit here with elaborate everything I say I want it to lead to something to you. I want it to be fruitful and valuable. So my ask to you is to shoot me an email at Bella at junk consulting dotnet. How do you feel about this podcast? Let me know. That’s my only question. How do you feel about the podcast? Email me Bella at junk consulting dotnet I might just read your comment good or bad, anonymously or publicly if you want your name on it next, or one of the episodes. But I want you guys to consider this is your ego holding you back from getting feedback is your good girl syndrome, preventing you from opening yourself up and being a little bit vulnerable or realizing that it’s actually not you it’s your business or some food for thought for you. You guys, thank you so much for listening. I hope that you continue to like and subscribe and share. Leave your comments email me if you want a 20-minute call Go To jumpconsulting.net/20. If you’re finally ready to take the jump and join us in the mastermind, head on over to jumpcsonulting.net/mastermind you can jump right on in there. And yeah, just remember when life gets you down, always keep jumping by now

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